DR. KENNETH L. HACKER

Professor and Department Head

Department of Communication Studies

New Mexico State University

 

Professor Hacker is a Distinguished Achievement Professor at NMSU. His main areas of research and teaching concern new media networking (NMN), political communication, and communication and national security.

 

khacker@nmsu.edu

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

 

SOME PUBLICATIONS and PAPERS 

 

NEW BOOK IN PROGRESS: DEMOCRACY IN A NEWORK SOCIETY (being co-edited with Jan van Dijk). 

 

 

Hacker, K. , Boje, D., Nisbett, V., Henry, N., & Abdelali, A. (2013). Interpreting Iranian Leaders Conflict Framing by Combining Latent Semantic Analysis and Pragmatist Storytelling Theory. Paper presented to the Political Communication Division of the National Communication Association, Washington, DC.  

 

Hacker, K., and Morgan, E. (2013). Empowering and disempowering aspects of new media networking and digital democracy. Journal of Technology Diffusion,  4(3), 84-94

 

Hacker, K. (2012). Social media and new military public affairs policies. Citizen 2.0:  Public and Governmental Interaction through Web 2.0 Technologies. A book edited by Dr. Kathryn Kloby, Monmouth University, NJ and Dr. Maria J. D Agostino, John Jay College, NY. IGI Global, pp. 174-195.  

 

Hacker, K., and Morgan. E. (2011). Issues of digital disempowerment and new media networking (NMN) in relation to e-government.In Cropf, R., & Krummenmacher, W. (Eds.). Information Communication Technologies and the Virtual Public Sphere. Hershey, PA: IGA Global, pp. 92-115. 

 

Hacker, K., Morgan, E., Mason, S. (2009). Digital disempowerment in a network society.  Book chapter in E-Collaboration edited by Ned Kock.

 

Hacker, K.(2008). Candidate Images. Encyclopedia of Political Communication. Sage Publications. 

 

Hacker, K.(2008) Political Images. International Encyclopedia of Communication. Blackwell. 

 

Morgan, E., and Hacker, K. (2007). Boundaries in Genetic Discourse: Racial and Ethnic Self-Identification, Communication Research Reports, 24,1-7. PDF

 

2006 Conference Paper:  Hacker, K., Coombs, M., Weaver, C., & McCulloh, G. (2006). Possible Uses of Blogs and Computer-Mediated Communication (CMC) for Depolarizing Political Discourse. Paper presented to the Communication and Technology division (debate panel), Dresden, Germany, June, 2006. 

 

Book Chapter. Hacker, K, Mason, S. and Morgan, E. (2006). Digital disempowerment. In Emma Rooksby (Ed.) Information Technology and Social Justice, Idea Group, Inc. Release expected December, 2005.

 

2005 Conference Paper:  Morgan, E., & Hacker, K. (2005).  Boundaries in genetic research: Toward a dialogic interactive bioethics. Paper presented to the theme session of the International Communication Association, New York City, May.

 

Hacker, K. (2004).  The Potential of Computer-Mediated Communication (CMC) for Political Structuration. Javnost/The Public, 11, 5-26.

 

Hacker, K,.  & Mason, S. (2003).  "Ethical gaps in studies of the digital divide". Ethics and Information Technology 5 (2003): 99-115. 

 

2003 Full Article: The Digital Divide as a Complex and Dynamic Phenomenon Special Issue: Remapping the Digital Divide. The Information Society. Authors: Jan van Dijk and Kenneth L. Hacker.

 

Hacker, K., and Mason, S. (2003). Applying Communication Theory to Digital Divide Research. IT and Society.

 

2002 Article:  Network Democracy and the Fourth World. Communications.  Author: Kenneth L. Hacker. Reprint upon request.

 

2001 Article: Hacker, Kenneth L.; Steiner, Robert. Hurdles of Access and Benefits of Usage for Internet Communication. Communication Research Reports, Vol. 18 Issue 4, p399-407. 

 

2002 article. Hacker, Kenneth L.; Steiner, Robert. The Digital Divide for Hispanic Americans. Howard Journal of Communications, Oct-Dec2002, Vol. 13 Issue 4, p267-283. 

 

Hacker, K. (2002). Network Democracy, Political Will, and the Fourth World. EURICOM, The Netherlands. Keynote speaker. 

 

2000 ICA Paper Abstract:  The Digital Divide as a Complex and Dynamic Phenomenon.  Authors: Jan van Dijk and Kenneth L. Hacker. 

 

2000 Article: Hacker, Kenneth L., et al. (2000). "Components of Candidate Images: Statistical Analysis of the Issue-Persona Dichotomy in the Presidential Campaign of 1996." Communication Monographs 67.3. 

 

Hacker, Kenneth L.; Goss, Blaine; Townley, Charles; Horton, Valerie. Employee Attitudes Regarding Electronic Mail Policies: A Case Study. Management Communication Quarterly, Feb 98, Vol. 11 Issue 3, p422, 31p. 

 

1998 ICA Paper Abstract:  Components of Candidate Images: Further Statistical Analysis of the Issue-persona Dichotomy in the Presidential Campaign of 1996.  Authors: Kenneth Hacker, Walter Zakahi, Maury Giles. 

 

Hacker, K. (1996). Missing links in the evolution of electronic democratization. Media, Culture, and Society, 18, 213-232.

 

Hacker, K. (1996). Virtual democracy and Computer-Mediated Political Communication (CMPC): The Role of the Clinton White House in Facilitating Electronic Democratization and Political Interactivity.

 

1994 Top Three WSCA Paper Abstract: Reconsidering the Issue-Image Dichotomy: A Statistical Test of Key Candidate Image Construct Assumptions. Authors: K. Hacker & W. Zakahi. 

 

MY BOOKS:

 

CANDIDATE IMAGES IN PRESIDENTIAL ELECTIONS

 

DIGITAL DEMOCRACY: ISSUES OF THEORY AND PRACTICE

 

PRESIDENTIAL CANDIDATE IMAGES

 

 

 

 

 

STRATEGIC DISCOURSE ANALYSIS GROUP AT NMSU (K. Hacker, one of the founders)  

 

LINK TO MY BLOG WHICH INCLUDED MY PREDICTION FOR THE 2012 PRESIDENTIAL ELECTION.

 

Talk notes from NCA panel on public diplomacy, Washington, DC, 2013.

OCTOBER  24, 2006   STRATEGIC  COMMUNICATION AND TERRORISM  TALK NOTES

 

Here is a new site linked from here regarding presidential candidate images of 2008.

My online book about “race.”

 

 
 

Some of my favorite links are:

 

KENNETH HACKER COMMUNICATION RESEARCH RESOURCE PAGE

 

INTERNATIONAL COMMUNICATION ASSOCIATION

 

NATIONAL COMMUNICATION ASSOCIATION

 

THE WHITE HOUSE

 

The Center of the Web

 

page modified January 7, 2014

 

 

My first publication from graduate school (Thank you Dr. Susan Glaser, University of Oregon!)

 

 

Cluster Map